Programme of the Conference

Thursday 18 January 2018

15:00 – 16:30 – Workshop: Home on the Move – Translating notions of home
Hosted by Ricarda Vidal (King’s College London)

To register for the workshop Talking Transformations hosted  by Ricarda Vidal on 18 January please send an e-mail to A.Grebner[at]hhs.nl


17:00 – 19:00 – Opening Keynote Lecture by Luuk van Middelaar

To register for the lecture by Luuk van Middelaar on 18 January please click on THIS link


Friday 19 January 2018

9:00-9:15       Welcome and Opening of conference by Prof. Jaap De Zwaan (THUAS, The Hague, Netherlands)

9:30 – 11:30   Panel Sessions 1, 2 and 3 – Tuning into…

Panel 1: The Existing Narratives

  1. Gjovalin Macaj (St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford, UK) – Connecting conflicting narratives on European integration
  2. Margriet Krijtenburg (THUAS, The Netherlands) – Europe, dare to be yourself! The founding principles as guidelines for EU today
  3. Christos Frangonikolopoulos (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece) & Stamatis Poulakidakos (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece) – The financial and refugee “crises”: Discursive practices and narratives on Europe in the northern and southern public spheres.
  4. Vedran Obucina (Independent Institute for European and Globalisation Studies, Rijeka, Croatia) – Conflicting Religious Narratives on Europe.

Panel 2: Daily life narratives

  1. Olga Orlic, Anita Sujoldzic, Anja Ivekovic Martinis (Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb) – How (New) European values are perceived by elderly people in Zadar, Rijeka and Pula
  2. Murray Pratt (Amsterdam University College, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) and Nicholas Manganas (University of Technology, Sidney, Australia) – Beyond the Eurotypes: Alternative Narratives of Contemporary European Culture
  3. Andres Sanchez Padilla (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain) – Is History our Ally? The Trouble with European narratives of the Past
  4. Antje Grebner and Guido van Hengel (THUAS, the Netherlands) – Underrepresented Narratives of European Integration: Workers in the Netherlands and Germany.

Panel 3: Alternative narratives of ‘Europa’

  1. Dina Gusejnova (University of Sheffield, UK) – Before interrail: Imagining Europe on the train between the Belle Epoque and the outbreak of the Second World War
  2. Stefan Couperus (University of Groningen, The Netherlands) – A Europe of Cities: Narrating Urban Europe as a Shared Space in the Interwar Period
  3. Kevan A Feshami (University of Colorado, Boulder, US) – “Europa Erwache” – A look into the Ongoing Construction of a Racialized European Identity and Its Völkisch Roots
  4. Guido van Hengel (THUAS, The Netherlands) – Europeanism as a Third Way: Conservative notions of a European identity before the Second World War.

11:45 – 12:45 – Plenary and Discussion

12:45 – 13:30 – Lunch

13:30 – 14:45 – Keynote Lecture by Prof. Nico Carpentier (Uppsala University, Sweden)

15:00 – 17:00 – Panel 4, 5 and 6 (…the noise of Europe)

Panel 4: Contrasts and Cacophonies

  1. Ben Duke (Keele University, UK) – Who can shout the loudest? The changing hierarchy of EU rival narratives.
  2. Joanna Orzechowska-Waclawska & Natasza Styczynska (Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland) – Polish visions and revisions of Europe.
  3. Georgios Giannakopoulos (Queen Mary University, London, UK) – Of national questions and multi-national unions: Britain, Europe and the phantoms of Brexit
  4. Nicolaas Kraft van Ermel (Netherlands-Russia Centre, Groningen, The Netherlands) – Ukraina Europeae? Ukranian historical narratives and Ukraine’s troubled path to European integration.
  5. Aziz Elmuradov (University of Bielefeld, Germany) – Competing narratives of the EU in Russian  foreign policy: in search for identity or policy

Panel 5: How to communicate

  1. Luis Bouza Garcia (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain) & Alvaro Oleart (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium) – Jobs and Growth or threat to democracy? The narrative struggle for the signification of TTIP
  2. Olivier Arifon (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium) – Lobbying of professional’s bodies versus European public space
  3. Alex Forbes (Independent Scholar) – ‘An Image of Citizenship: Michael Haneke’s 71 Fragments of a utopian Europe
  4. Miruna Troncota (National University of Political Studies and Public Administration, Bucharest, Romania) – Reverse Europeanization, Media Narratives in Romania

Panel 6: New spaces of communication

  1. Astrid van Weyenberg (Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands) – “Shared (hi)stories as a remedy for Europe?”
  2. Laura M. Pana (Migrationlab, Vienna, Austria) – How to create new spaces of encounter where new ways of communication that challenge official narratives can emerge in times of European crisis?
  3. European Cultural Foundation (Amsterdam, Netherlands) – Idea Camp – A community of practice towards social change
  4. Viktorija L.A. Ceginskas & Tuuli Lähdesmäki (University of Jyväskylä, Finland) – The European vision and the voices of Europeans: Comparing views on a European cultural heritage in today’s EU
  5. Barbara Sterl (Europe Office, Nuremberg, Germany) – Europe in the hearts and minds of EU citizens living in Nuremberg.

17:15 – 18:15 – Discussion and closing of the conference.

18:15 – 18:30 – Closing play (see cultural programme).

 

CALL FOR PAPERS – Deadline 15 sept.

Tuning into the Noise of Europe: Conference on a new narrative of Europe in times of crisis

The Hague University of Applied Sciences

After the sovereign debt crisis, the austerity responses of the powerful northern member states with its devastating results for the southern member states, the European Union finds itself confronted with old and new crisis of defining its future.

The European narrative though remains hidden under thick layers of Eurosceptic discourses, and does not provide for a straightforward paved path. Communicating the European vision is all but disrupted between the European elites and the recipients in the member states. Populist parties across Europe hail the death of the European vision. Once more, we find ourselves at crossroads. We need to choose wisely. The current cacophony of narratives of disengagement and isolationism, exemplified by the outcome of the Brexit referendum, seems to put the final dismissive stamp on a peaceful, prosperous and united Europe. It becomes clear that Europe needs a moment of reflection, and take stock of the available paths ahead in the search for a vision that could lead the way.

The aim of this conference, however, is not simply to contribute to this cacophony of voices, or to dwell on constructed narratives that lack substance and remain vague. This conference seeks to identify the reality of the European project as it is lived and perceived and sometimes feared by European citizens.

Papers are invited on the topics relating to (but not limited

  • The relevance of existing narratives (cosmopolitan Europe narrative, human rights narrative, shared history and goal narrative, European citizenship narrative, free trade narrative)
  • The relevance of subdued narratives (working class, generational gap, North-South divide, East-West divide, minorities etc.)
  • Elite vs non-elite narratives
  • Rival narratives in member states and EU institutions
  • The institutional narrative
  • The communication of European narratives. (political communication, position of sender and recipient, malfunctioning of communication)
  • Forms of new (more inclusive) dialogues

We especially welcome scholars from the fields of political science, International Relations, anthropology, sociology, history and communication.

The following information should be included in the paper proposal: 1) Title; 2) Abstract (up to 500 words); 3) Short biography (up to 200 words) 3) Contact information.

Deadline for submission: 15 September, 2017.

Contact Info:

Antje Grebner –  a.grebner@hhs.nl

URL:

http://noise-of-europe.com

 

Lisbon: 10 Years After

noiseofeurope1

In December 2007 the EU member states signed the Treaty of Lisbon. This treaty was supposed to be the ultimate answer to decades of different levels of multi-speed integrating and disintegrating forces at work in Europe. It was to bring together all the strings of the post-1945 narrative of a Europe that came together to build and preserve peace and prosperity. It was to send a clear message to the future and provide the structural and institutional scaffolding for our common European narrative. It set the guidelines in terms of political, economic, political and cultural integration. Yet, 10 year later, this vision of Europe seems to lose itself in a socio-political, economic and well as institutional quagmire that is being answered by a surge in political populism and discontent across the member states.

After the sovereign debt crisis, the austerity responses of the powerful northern member states with its devastating results for the southern member states, the European Union finds confronted with new crisis: the lack of solidarity in Central and Eastern European member states in few of the refugee influx. The European narrative remains hidden under thick layers of Eurosceptic discourses, and does not provide for a straightforward paved path. Communicating the European vision is all but disrupted between the European elites and the recipients in the member states. Populist parties across Europe hail the death of the European vision. Once more, we find ourselves at crossroads. We need to choose wisely.

The current cacophony of narratives of disengagement and isolationism, exemplified by the outcome of the Brexit referendum, seems to put the final dismissive stamp on a peaceful, prosperous and united Europe. It becomes clear that Europe needs a moment of reflection, and take stock of the available visions in the search for a vision that could lead the way on the path ahead.

This conference seeks to bring together old and new narratives. It is looking for ways that could counteract the current Eurosceptic and anti-EU rhetoric and show a way forward to recover the vision of a peaceful and united Europe.